Pueblo animal shelter warns people to keep pets inside their homes or they could run away

Posted on July 3, 2015 By

PUEBLO, Colo. –

Fireworks are legal in Pueblo County, but that doesn’t mean everyone will have a great Fourth of July.

Paws for Life will not do pet adoptions until after the holiday weekend. The group is afraid fireworks could scare the new pets.

Jean Engel’s dog Boo ran away when she heard fireworks on Wednesday.

Her dog was found, but not in the condition she expected.

“She does have a fractured pelvis. We need to take care of that, and hopefully she will heal well,” she said.

Engel is one of many pet owners whose pets ran away this week because of fireworks.

“It’s one of our least favorite weeks of the whole year. More animals are lost, scared and hurt in the first two weeks of July than any other time of the year,” Paws for Life Manager Linda Mitchell said.

She said if you don’t want your pets to run away during the Fourth of July, your best bet is to keep them inside and if you can, lock them in a bathroom or a bedroom and turn the radio or TV up loud.

“Don’t take them with you. They don’t know the environment they are in. They get scared, they run and they don’t know their way back home. Don’t leave them in the backyard and go to your friend’s barbecue until one or two in the morning, you won’t find them,” Mitchell said.

As for Engel, instead of fireworks on the Fourth of July, she will make sure Boo gets better.

The Pueblo Animal Shelter will be doing pet adoptions except on the Fourth of July.

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Fourth of July: Top holiday for pets to get lost

Posted on July 2, 2015 By

WASHINGTON (WJLA/ AP) – Flashing lights and loud booms may be exciting for some during the Fourth of July weekend, but for pets, it can be a nightmare.

The unfamiliar noise, rush of bright lights, swarms of people, strange smells and sometimes firework debris falling, can prove to be too much for your beloved pet, sending them leaping over, through or under the fence.

More pets go missing during the Fourth of July weekend than any other time of the year, according to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.

“Every year we see several more pets get loose and run the neighborhoods during the Fourth of July weekend,” Scott Giacoppo, chief of field’s services for Washington Humane Society, told WJLA in an interview.

“We anticipate this will happen and thus, have extra personnel and patrol staffed.”

Giacoppo went on to say that this situation isn’t much different than the reaction you would see with pets and thunder, but with fireworks, it can be nonstop.

Sadly, when pets run away in fear, they cause not only a safety threat for themselves, but also for others. Sometimes, pets run in front of cars, causing major accidents, unexpectedly being struck and killed.

Giacoppo said it is important to keep your pets inside, in a safe and secure location this holiday weekend, but if they are otherwise anxious, it may be worth talking to your vet about alternative solutions.

David Wright, dog trainer in Los Angeles, lists some dos and don’ts to keep your pet(s) safe, and your sanity:

DO

– Get collar IDs and microchips.

– Use a crate or keep animals in a room where they can’t flee.

– Crank up music or the television to mask the sound of fireworks.

– Provide water and food: Fear makes dogs pant, and unfamiliar food makes them anxious.

– Offer chewable toys or treats as a distraction.

___

DON’T

– Take a pooch to see fireworks unless it’s a noise-trained police K-9 or guide dog.

– Leave them outside, where they jump or dig to escape the yard.

– Approach dogs who look scared because they can attack.

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Pets have a safe place to stay during Blount evacuations

Posted on July 2, 2015 By

(WBIR-Maryville) The Blount County Animal Shelter is accepting dogs and cats from the train derailment evacuees who have no place to keep them or are in hotels that don’t accept pets.

Animal control officers have already picked up any pets from Heritage High School, one of the designated shelters for people forced to leave their homes, and are now asking individuals to drop off animals if needed.

The shelters can hold up to 75 large dogs and 100 cats, but officials also have a plan in place if they hit capacity, including partnering with PetSafe Village in Knoxville and working with local animal foster families.

They are now asking for volunteers to help foster animals so they can make room for the evacuated pets. They are moving to a 24-hour operation, and need volunteers to work 8-hour shifts, from 3 pm-11 pm and 11 pm-7 am.

They are asking for donations of animal crates to house the additional animals, and for pet food.

The shelter is located at 233 Currie Avenue in Maryville.

Read or Share this story: http://on.wbir.com/1LWRjga

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Keep pets in mind this Independence Day

Posted on July 2, 2015 By

As American humans celebrate Independence Day this weekend, it’s important to remember that not all species are fans of the celebratory explosions that often accompany the holiday.

Our canine friends may not be so keen to fireworks and firecrackers this weekend, so here are some locals in the know have offered tips on how to keep your pets safe and free from anxiety.

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Outdoot Column: Helpful hints to protect your pets from a coyote attack

Posted on July 2, 2015 By

As I read the story in Tuesday’s Bristol Press about the man in Southington who almost lost his little dog to a coyote, I couldn’t help but remember my own loss. Several years ago, I had let my cat, Nechia, out very early one October morning as I was leaving to go bow hunting. When I returned later that day, the cat was nowhere to be found.

Although she would sometimes be gone most of the day, as night fell I knew something wasn’t right. I drove around the neighborhood searching for her, all to no avail.

A few days later, I learned from my neighbor that on the day the cat disappeared, he’d seen and heard some commotion in the back of his property. I searched the back yard and found quite a bit of fur from my cat and I knew right then she was taken by a coyote.

In my early days of bow hunting for deer, the coyote was a seldom seen (if ever) critter. As the years pass, they have encroached into every part of Connecticut. They’re found in every town nowadays.

Stories told to me by other deer hunters tell of an animal that’s capable of taking down an adult deer. So a little dog or cat simply doesn’t stand much of a chance.

Pet owners should always be vigilant of their surroundings. Never let your pet outside alone after dark or in the very early morning, as these times are the “hunting” hours for coyotes.

Keep a good stout stick handy, it’s a good weapon to defend your pet if needed.

As I travel about, I’m always seeing posters saying, lost cat or dog, reward! I know in my heart that those pets were most likely taken by a coyote.

Here in Connecticut, hunting season for coyotes is open pretty much year round, except for during the spring turkey season, late April to the end of May. All one needs is a small game license to pursue these animals. I’ve personally never hunted them but I may try my hand at it sometime this year, maybe over the winter.

The Sunday bow hunting bill is still on the table. I haven’t heard any news from my sources as of yet. I’m guessing in the coming weeks we’ll have the answer, “yea or nay.”

On the fishing scene, reports of striped bass seem to be what’s hot. Some pretty big fish are being caught in Long Island Sound. Blue fish are also in the mix. Fluke and porgy’s are still kind of slow but improving weekly.

The Farmington River is seeing good trout fishing with excellent water conditions. From the “Hogsback” down to the Unionville Bridge fish can be found. Inland lakes are a producing good numbers of largemouth bass so far this season. Some of the local ponds, such as Batterson Park Pond in Farmington and Squantz Pond in New Fairfield are giving up some nice walleye to fishermen’s nets. Enjoy the outdoor life …

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Keeping Pets Safe Fourth of July Weekend

Posted on July 2, 2015 By

Shelters nationwide experience a 30 percent increase of animal influx in the days following the Fourth of July. And of that 30 percent, less than half are eventually reunited with their owners.

Shelters nationwide experience a 30 percent increase of animal influx in the days following the Fourth of July. And of that 30 percent, less than half are eventually reunited with their owners.

The overwhelming effects of fireworks put animals in a fight or flight reflex.

“The problem with the Fourth of July is that while we are celebrating our independence and enjoying the fireworks, the firework show itself actually assaults the senses of the animals. Lot of sounds, lots of sights, lots of smells that they don’t understand,” said Randy McDonald, Souris Valley Animal Shelter director.

So it’s on the shoulders of pet owners to protect their dog from ending up in a shelter. Owners should keep pets indoors with background sounds such as a TV.

“And give them a place to hide, so if that means a crate or something of that nature where they can kind of burrow in and feel safe. Have a safe, happy Fourth of July, but if you are a pet owner, it’s your responsibility to make sure that your pets are accounted for and that they are well taken care of,” McDonald said.

Microchipping your pet is a good idea to make sure a lost pet can be reunited with their owner.

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Fireworks: scary for pets

Posted on July 1, 2015 By

United States Humane Society reminds pet owners that while July 4 fireworks may be fun for them, the loud noises and bright flashes tend to terrify animals.
LEXINGTON, Ky. (WTVQ) — United States Humane Society released an announcement remind pet owners that while July 4 fireworks may be fun for them, the loud noises and bright flashes tend to terrify animals.

Shelters around the country say that they experience a jump in lost pets around the July 4 weekend, because the dogs and cats will become so scared that they attempt to escape in any way possible – including jumping out windows or through screen doors.

HSUS asks that you follow these tips to help your pet this weekend.

-Keep your pet away from fireworks. It’s best to leave them at home and indoors, preferably with a radio or TV turned on to hide jarring noises. If you cannot leave your pet unattended, make sure they are leashed at all times.

-If you know your pet is scared by fireworks, ask a veterinarian for help. There are medications and techniques that might help soothe your pet’s anxiety.

-Protect your pet from heat stroke. Never leave them in a parked car, and watch out for signs of heat stroke. Make sure to keep your pet hydrated.

-All pets should have a collar and ID tag, even indoor-only pets. If possible, have them microchipped.

If you find a lost pet, please take the address on the tag, or the pet itself to your local animal shelter so they can be reunited with their family.

If you lose a pet, contact your local animal control and shelters immediately, to let them know to be on the lookout.

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Keeping pets safe during the holiday season

Posted on July 1, 2015 By

The Fourth of July is a holiday full of so many wonderful things – warm weather, pools, boating on Grand Lake, barbecues, and fireworks.

But many of these same things can be dangerous for our pets. Here are safety tips from Second Chance Pet Rescue that will help you and your pet have a fun and accident-free Independence Day:

1. Leave your Pet at Home! The safest place for your pet is safely inside your home, not in a crowded, unfamiliar park, or a noisy backyard. The resulting panic due to fireworks may make them run away or jump a fence in a terrified attempt to find safety. Locking them in the car is not an option. Your pet may suffer heat stroke, organ failure, and even brain injury from the heat.

2. Provide a Safe Spot from Loud Noises. Whether it’s a closet or a crate, it’s good for pets to have a “go to” place for relaxing or hiding away. However, if a crate creates more anxiety, or if your pet isn’t acclimated to a crate, it should not be used. A crate is more effective if your dog has grown up using a crate, not as a last resort for confinement.

3. NEVER EVER Use Fireworks Around Pets. While lit fireworks can pose a danger to curious pets and potentially result in severe burns and/or trauma to the face and paws, unused fireworks can be hazardous too. Some fireworks contain potentially toxic substances such as arsenic, potassium nitrate, and other heavy metals.

4. Have your Pet Properly Identified. Proper identification may be the only way to retrieve your pet should he/she manage to break loose and become lost. Consider fitting your pet with a microchip, ID tag, or other popular method of identification. It is also a good idea to have a recent picture of your pet in case you have to put up “Lost Pet” signs.

5. Keep Emergency Contact Info Handy. Very important. Keep the contact information for your veterinarian or the nearest animal hospital handy just in case your dog or cat has a medical emergency.

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Pasco Animal Services partners with Pets for Patriots

Posted on July 1, 2015 By

Pasco County Animal Services is honoring people who have served their country by partnering with Pets for Patriots.

The goal is to facilitate adoptions of eligible pets by veterans and their families in Pasco and throughout the Tampa Bay area, county officials explained in a news release, according to PCAS Manager Michael Shumate.

The nonprofit Pets for Patriots provides financial support for veterans who rescue at-risk shelter animals across the country.

Retired and active duty military members, who rescue a qualifying animal, are provided discounted food, products and veterinary costs through the program’s sponsors. Veterans can gain a life-changing animal without financial uncertainty.

Pets for Patriots aims to reduce the number of both veteran suicides as well as cat and dog euthanasia.

National statistics show that 22 veterans take their lives each day. Every eight seconds in the United States, one animal is euthanized. The program allows veterans and pets to share love, joy and companionship.

Retired or active duty service members must apply through Pets for Patriots and provide proof of current military service or honorable discharge. After acceptance into the program, the adoption can be completed.

Cats and dogs eligible for this program must meet at least one of three criteria: be 2 years old or older; at least 40 pounds at time of adoption; or have special needs.

Go to http://petsfor patriots.org/patriots/qualify/military-service for application forms.

The Animal Services Adoption Center, at 19640 Dogpatch Lane, is open from noon until 6:30 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday.

For additional information or volunteer opportunities, go online to the website at www .pascocountyfl.net/PAS or the Facebook page at www.facebook.com/pcasap or call (727) 834-3216.

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Pets and fireworks don't mix

Posted on July 1, 2015 By

The Independence Holiday weekend is typically all about fun in the sun, BBQ and of course, fireworks.

All of this can be lots of fun for people, but not much fun for our pets.

According to The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), nearly one-in-five lost pets first go missing after being scared by the sound of fireworks, thunderstorms or other loud noises.

Make sure your cat or dog is wearing a collar and identification tag with your current contact information, so you can be reunited quickly if your pet does escape. You can also write your name and phone number in permanent ink on the inside of your pet’s collar, just in case the tags get lost. All pets, even those kept indoors full-time, should wear collars with identification tags at all times. Indoor-only animals can become so frightened during fireworks displays that they take desperate measures to escape the noise, such as breaking through window or door screens.

Also, consider microchipping your pets.

“Losing your pet is heartbreaking, but there are other dangers lurking in your own backyard that might not cross your mind as you celebrate this 4th of July,” said Dr. Tina Wismer, medical director of the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center. “It’s critical that pet owners consider their animals’ well-being during holiday celebrations, and when enjoying the outdoors all season long.”

The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center offers the following tips:

  • Never leave alcoholic drinks unattended where pets can reach them. Alcoholic beverages have the potential to poison pets. If ingested, the animal could become very intoxicated and weak, severely depressed or could go into a coma. Death from respiratory failure is also a possibility in severe cases.
  • Do not apply any sunscreen or insect repellent product to your pet that is not labeled specifically for use on animals. Ingestion of sunscreen products can result in drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, excessive thirst and lethargy. The misuse of insect repellent that contains DEET can lead to neurological problems.
  • Always keep matches and lighter fluid out of your pets’ reach. Certain types of matches contain chlorates, which could potentially damage blood cells and result in difficulty breathing-or even kidney disease in severe cases. Lighter fluid can be irritating to skin, and if ingested can produce gastrointestinal irritation and central nervous system depression. If lighter fluid is inhaled, aspiration pneumonia and breathing problems could develop.
  • Keep your pets on their normal diet. Any change, even for one meal, can give your pets severe indigestion and diarrhea. This is particularly true for older animals who have more delicate digestive systems and nutritional requirements. And keep in mind that foods such as onions, chocolate, coffee, avocado, grapes & raisins, salt and yeast dough can all be potentially toxic to companion animals.
  • Do not put glow jewelry on your pets, or allow them to play with it. While the luminescent substance contained in these products is not highly toxic, excessive drooling and gastrointestinal irritation could still result from ingestions, and intestinal blockage could occur from swallowing large pieces of the plastic containers.
  • Keep citronella candles, insect coils and oil products out of reach. Ingestions can produce stomach irritation and possibly even central nervous system depression. If inhaled, the oils could cause aspiration pneumonia in pets.
  • Never use fireworks around pets! While exposure to lit fireworks can potentially result in severe burns and/or trauma to the face and paws of curious pets, even unused fireworks can pose a danger. Many types contain potentially toxic substances, including potassium nitrate, arsenic and other heavy metals.

Loud, crowded fireworks displays are no fun for pets, so please resist the urge to take them to Independence Day festivities. Instead, keep your little guys safe from the noise in a quiet, sheltered and escape-proof area at home.

Remember, the 4th of July festivities can be enjoyed by your ENTIRE family, with some extra thought and planning.

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